Search TXNP
txnp

< More How to's

Friday, December 15, 2017

Share: facebooktwitterdigg

Thrive on pressure
Harvey MacKay

November, 2014

Pressure.  The very word strikes fear into many people.  Winners thrive on pressure while losers fear it.  

 

What is pressure?  My definition of pressure is when you absolutely have to do something you are not prepared to do.  If you have to kick a field goal to win a big football game and you aren’t prepared to do it, you are going to be nervous.  You’re going to feel pressure.  But if you’ve really prepared for it, you can’t wait to show people how good you are.

 

That’s why winners look forward to pressure.  It brings out their best.  People who welcome pressure are more successful.


Conversely, pressure can cripple you if you’re not prepared.  When pressure is self-inflicted, it can control you.  Pressure is an attitude.  It’s 10 percent of what is happening and 90 percent of how you handle it.

Don’t be like by friend Mark.  They used to call him “Jigsaw” because every time he was faced with a problem, he went to pieces.

 

Tennis pro Billie Jean King said:  “Match point is a love-hate relationship.  The torment of ‘Oh, God, what am I doing here?’ and ‘This is it!  This is what I’ve been working for.’  I know this is why I paid the price.  This is what it’s all about if you want to be a champion. The challenge of that moment.  Match point!”

To be a champion in sports or business or any phase of life, you have to learn to handle pressure.  If you’ve prepared mentally and physically, you don’t have to worry.

 

During my corporate speeches I repeat one of my favorite aphorisms: “Practice makes perfect … not true.  You have to add one word … Perfect practice makes perfect.”  I wish that I had coined that phrase but I didn’t.  Legendary pro football coach Vince Lombardi did.    

 

This is why over my lifetime I’ve had numerous coaches to help me develop whatever natural talent I have.  I’ve had coaches for public speaking, writing, ideas/creativity, running marathons, golf, tennis, water skiing, swimming, bowling, basketball, to name only a few.  I’ve even had a dance coach … thanks to my wife.

 

Why do I have all of these coaches?  Because whatever my God-given talent is, whatever my God-given potential is … That’s it.  I can’t do any better.  But I will still try to do the best I can, with the best help I can get.

If I have a project, I’ll have a time and action calendar; get the best coaching I can find; and then try my hardest and focus and give it all I’ve got.

Should I feel pressure?  Yes, but I will use it to my advantage.  I’m as prepared as I can be.  I can’t do anymore. 

 

Research shows that one of the key ways to deal with pressure is to have a feeling of control.  And what better way to be in control than to be prepared and experienced.

 

Take NASA as an example.  NASA puts all its astronauts through situations they might encounter in space.  Who can even begin to think about what might happen thousands of miles in space?  The moon is more than 238,000 miles away from earth!  Pressure? You better believe it.  But they are prepared.  If you are familiar with what is happening to and around you, you will have a powerful feeling of confidence.

 

Let’s face it.  No matter what, you are going to be in pressure situations.  No one is free from pressure.  It can’t be avoided.  Don’t panic.  Don’t lose your cool.  Concentrate.  Return to fundamentals.  Get your confidence back.

As simple as it sounds, try taking deep, relaxing breaths.  Pressure often causes people to breathe more quickly and shallow.  Deep breathing allows oxygen to more efficiently enter the blood and the brain, which will help you think more clearly.  

 

Don’t stress over what you cannot control.  Everybody gets a curveball now and then.  Shake it off the best you can.  Be flexible and appreciate adversity.  It will help you grow stronger.

 

As Jacques Plante, a former professional hockey goalie for the Montreal Canadians once said, “How would you like it in your job if every time you made a small mistake, a red light went on over your desk and fifteen thousand people stood up and yelled at you?”

Try to relax.  Things could be worse.

 

Mackay’s Moral:  A diamond is a chunk of coal that made good under pressure.



rss 

Your TXNP Weekly E-Newsletter is made possible by the generosity of:

FROST in many Texas cities
THE SID RICHARDSON FOUNDATION in Fort Worth


TXNP Professional Members Are Dedicated to Texas and Texans.

Aurora Grants & Consulting |Dawson Murray Teague Communications | ELITE Research | FOR THE PHILANTHROPIST | Graystone Consulting | J A Churchill Associates | John F. Lewis PC | McConnell & Jones LLC



Sign up for your personal TXNP E-Newsletter

at-t Meadows Foundation express news HOBLITZELLE FOUNDATION v greenly zachry foundation w b h b bank of america southwest airlines Sid W. Richardson Foundation forst